Happy Baby Pose


Benefits:

  • brings awareness to the hip joints
  • stretches the groin and spine
  • promotes relaxation and happiness

Practicing Happy Baby Pose:

Do not include this pose in your practice if you have a neck or knee injury or if you are pregnant. Warm up for this pose by enjoying child’s pose and hero pose. After relaxing into happy baby pose, follow up with downward dog pose.

  1. Begin by laying on your yoga mat with your back supported by the ground
  2. Exhale your knees to your belly
  3. Inhaling, place your hands on the outsides of your feet and widen your knees before raising them up to your armpits
  4. Place both of your ankles above your knees so that your shins become perpendicular to the ground
  5. Flexing through yours heels, push your feet into your hands while you pull your hands toward the ground
  6. Smile!

This pose is beneficial for runners and non-runners alike.


I haven’t been posting as much recently because I have been focused on spending time with my HAPPY BABY (she is 8 weeks old today)


Thanks for reading & have a great day!

Bound Angle Pose


Benefits:

  • Improves circulation and increases energy
  • Stretches the groins, knees, and thighs
  • Reduces pain from sciatica and menstruation
  • Helps to alleviate mild depression and anxiety
  • Aids in the reduction of menopause symptoms
  • May ease childbirth when practiced throughout pregnancy
  • Provides therapeutic benefits for high blood pressure, flat feet, asthma, and infertility

Practicing Bound Angle Pose:

  • To prepare for this pose, practice hero pose, tree pose, and reclining hand-to-big-toe pose
  • If you have a knee or groin injury, practice this pose with blankets folded under the outer thighs
  • Begin in a seated position with your legs extending straight in front of you
  • Exhaling, bend your knees and bring your heels towards your pelvis before relaxing your knees to your sides towards the ground
  • Press your soles towards one another to create resistance
  • Keeping your outer feet on the ground, bring your feet towards your pelvis
  • Grasp your feet, ankles, or shins based on your level of comfort
  • Lengthen your torso extending the top of your head towards the sky
  • Optional: On your exhale, bending from the hip joints, bring your torso forward towards your feet
  • Remain in this pose for up to 5 minutes
  • To move out of this pose, inhale as you lift your knees towards the sky and extend the legs out in front of you
  • Follow up with forward bends, seated twists, and/or standing poses

Legs Up the Wall Pose

This pose provides both mental and physical benefits and can be a great resource for runners.


Contraindications

This pose should be avoided during menstruation or if you have serious neck issues, back issues, or eye issues such as glaucoma.

Benefits

As both an inversion and a restorative pose, Legs Up the Wall Pose offers many benefits including alleviating challenges with:

  • Arthritis
  • Blood pressure
  • Anxiety
  • Varicose veins
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Respiratory ailments
  • Migraines
  • Premenstrual syndrome
  • Digestive problems
  • Mild depression
  • Urinary disorders
  • Menopause
  • Tight hamstrings

Props

Restorative poses are supported and, as shown in the image above, support in this pose can include blankets, a strap, an eye pillow, and a sandbag.

Sequencing for this pose

This pose is typically sequenced near the end of a yoga practice, often just before pranayama or corpse pose. Preparation poses include hero pose, standing forward bend pose, reclining bound angle pose, and bridge pose.

Getting into this pose

  • The first step to getting into this pose is setting up your support. Lay your yoga mat on the floor with the short end next to the wall. Next, place up to 3 folded blankets along the short edge of your mat along the wall as shown in the image above. Optional: place a strap, eye pillow, and sandbag alongside your mat.
  • If you tend to have tighter hamstrings, consider placing your blanket farther from the wall and using lower support (i.e., <2 blankets). If your hamstrings are more flexible, set yourself up closer to the wall and consider utilizing higher support (i.e., 2-3 blankets).
  • Your height will also play a role in how far away from the wall you set yourself up. Those who are shorter tend to need to be closer to the wall than those who are taller. Experimenting with how close you are to the wall may take some time and I recommend beginning with your support about 5-6 inches away from the wall.
  • Move into this pose by starting in a seated position on the right side of your mat with the right side of your body located next to the wall. On your exhale, swing both of your legs from the floor up onto the wall. At the same time move your head and shoulders onto your mat. If you are using blankets in this pose, check that your sitting bones are resting between your blankets and the wall. Notice an arch in your torso. If your torso is flat or your back is rounded, adjust your support by bending your knees and pushing into the wall to lift your pelvis off your support. While your pelvis is lifted, adjust your support so that it is higher and then slowly lower your pelvis back onto your support.
  • Using your hands, lift the base of your skull away from your neck. Feel your shoulder blades extending away from the spine, soften your throat, and allow your arms to reach out to your sides with palms up.
  • While engaging your leg muscles, feel them relaxing into the support of the wall. You may place a strap around your thighs to provide additional support and relaxation to the legs. You may also add to your support in this pose by placing a sandbag on your feet. To do this, bend your knees as if you were going to do bound angle pose and place the sandbag on top of your heels before carefully extending your feet back up the wall. This step should be done before placing the strap. Finally, close your eyes and feel free to utilize an eye pillow.
  • Feel free to remain in this pose for 5-15 minutes. When coming out of this pose, bend your knees and push your feet against the wall in order to lift your pelvis and remove the support from under you. After you lower your pelvis back onto the floor, you may bend your knees and roll to the side before using your arms to push yourself up into a seated position.

Run Your Mind Training Workbook by Julia Raffaini

New Release! Written by Elevate Running Founder, Julia Raffaini, this book was published yesterday.

Description

My intention for this workbook is to help runners become more successful by improving their mental training. This workbook is designed to both introduce you to general concepts in sport psychology and to help you to implement psychology techniques to improve your running performance. Throughout this workbook, you will focus on enhancing your goal development, motivation, mental toughness, confidence, concentration, and energy management. This workbook contains some information about caring for the body including yoga practices to supplement your running training. This workbook also contains several sample training plans and a training journal section in which you will be able to integrate the information that you have learned throughout this workbook into your training.

To purchase the workbook now, visit:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/1793032904

February Yoga Practice


This yoga practice is excellent for runners and is designed to increase hip flexibility. Allow your breath to guide you as you move through the poses listed below. Please visit the link associated with each pose for an image of the pose and additional information including pose alignment and benefits.


Opening Cycle:

  • Begin this practice seated on your mat in Easy Pose: https://www.yogajournal.com/poses/easy-pose
  • While in this pose, notice your breath. Check in with your intention for this practice: What brought you to this practice today? What do you hope to gain physically? What do you want to gain mentally?
  • Warm up the spine in Cat/ Cow Pose: https://www.yogajournal.com/poses/cat-pose
  • Follow your breathing: allow your inhale to lead you into cow pose and your exhale to guide you into cat pose.

Sun Salute Sequence

Standing Sequence: remain in each pose for 3+ breaths and allow your breath to support you in moving from one pose to another.

Deepening Cycle:

Inverting & Quieting Cycles: